Bookmarks

Yahoo Gmail Google Facebook Delicious Twitter Reddit Stumpleupon Myspace Digg

Search queries

why did Scabbers bite goyle, fuldataler mineralwasser, bikemate fahrradcomputer t52434 anleitung, frank zappa iq 172 liam gallagher 164, "heartbroke kid" "previous episode references", bikemate t52434 anleitung, marietta edgecombe cop out, kaufland autobatterie, nasi goreng in dosen kaufen, micromaxx mm 3544 universalfernbedienung

Links

XODOX
Impressum

#1: AFter the Smell Has Gone

Posted on 2006-07-23 13:43:29 by Mel.Brennan

Hey, now that the new car smell is gone, can anyone offer any
substantive contribution to the cultural landscape from these films?
Google groups/usenet groups' tolkien boards have generally gone back to
discussion of the book. You saw, for a short while, parody of Gollum
and "my precious" in various media...is that about it? Noone I ask can
hum a single melody from any film...have we moved on to the
newest-latest?

And isn't that the clearest indictment of these moving pictures that
claim to be representative of the second most-purchased book of all
time (in English), after the Bible? Isn't that evidence that the film
actually lacks the things that link the book to our consciousness (how
many people re-read the book(s)? How many have sought out the films
again...?), and instead offered us the special effects de jour, along
with Viggo for the ladies and Liv for the guys?

Subways with "FRODO LIVES" traveling the rails in NYC after ROTK was
published...today...what? Maybe this is the role films play today; to
simply pass through, like a cinematic lactose intolerance.

Maybe I'm just missing it. Maybe there are cultural outposts awash with
appreciation for Orlando Bloom's dialogue (btw, can you offer from
memory any memorable dialogue, other than "my precious" or "you shall
not pass"? Anybody remember anything at all from any of the "speeches"
Astin's Sam offered in two of the three films, which were lauded by
those in love with these pictures at the time?); maybe there are sites
overflowing with posts celebrating Rhys-Davies' humorous take on Gimli;
mayber there are threads that continue to this day that celebrate the
reverberations of the Elves at Helms Deep - the last LAST "Last
Alliance" - as auteur genius...

BUUUUUUUUT...I doubt it.

I'll check in on this thread in a few years. See how these great, GREAT
cinematic acheivements are doing. My guess is, probably about as well
as KING KONG, and less admirably than HEAVENLY CREATURES.

With nothing like the impact of the book, which, conversely, becomes
more revered in an ever-increasing fantasy and sci-fi market, not more
typical and common.

Report this message

#2: Re: AFter the Smell Has Gone

Posted on 2006-07-23 14:16:18 by Noh Phu Ling

<a href="mailto:Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com" target="_blank">Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com</a> wrote:
&gt; Hey, now that the new car smell is gone,.......

Notwithstanding your light-touch sarcasm, Theoden had some very good lines.

I revisit both the books and the extended version DVDs from time to
time. Despite the potential for acrimonious personalized frothing at the
mouth, each has strong points within its medium.

Were I forced to choose one over the other, of course, it would be the
books. YMMV.

Pete H

Report this message

#3: Re: AFter the Smell Has Gone

Posted on 2006-07-23 16:33:49 by Speaking Clock

pmhilton &lt;<a href="mailto:pmhilton&#64;mfx.net" target="_blank">pmhilton&#64;mfx.net</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Notwithstanding your light-touch sarcasm, Theoden had some very good
&gt; lines.

Eek, such as &quot;No parent should die before their child&quot;? (owtte)

However, much can be forgiven by way of bad lines here and there for the
glorious visual spectacle. Who can forget the sight of Eomer riding
into battle?
--
Speaking Clock

Report this message

#4: Re: AFter the Smell Has Gone

Posted on 2006-07-23 20:10:05 by thomas-ml

&lt;<a href="mailto:Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com" target="_blank">Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Anybody remember anything at all from any of the &quot;speeches&quot;
&gt; Astin's Sam offered in two of the three films, which were lauded by
&gt; those in love with these pictures at the time

Actually, I think that most of the lines which &quot;stick&quot; are lines from
the books, such as the glorious &quot;I can't carry it for you, but I can
carry you [and it as well]&quot; if we consider Sam's lines.

In fact, I re-watched RotK two years ago, and, whenever I heard a
beautiful line, I looked up in the book, and it was there. The most
beautiful lines, those we remember (does anyone remember the insipid
speech of Aragorn at the Black Gate ?), are Tolkien's.

--
Thomas Deniau

Report this message

#5: Re: AFter the Smell Has Gone

Posted on 2006-07-23 21:53:20 by Christopher Kreuzer

<a href="mailto:Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com" target="_blank">Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com</a> &lt;<a href="mailto:Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com" target="_blank">Mel.Brennan&#64;gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt; Hey, now that the new car smell is gone, can anyone offer any
&gt; substantive contribution to the cultural landscape from these films?
&gt; Google groups/usenet groups' tolkien boards have generally gone back
&gt; to discussion of the book. You saw, for a short while, parody of
&gt; Gollum and &quot;my precious&quot; in various media...is that about it? Noone I
&gt; ask can hum a single melody from any film...have we moved on to the
&gt; newest-latest?

Well, a certain type of film fan moves on to the 'newest-latest' anyway.
Book fans might not be the sort to hum tunes from films. Fans of the
film's soundtrack (and there are quite a few) would be the ones to ask
to hum a melody from the films.

&gt; And isn't that the clearest indictment of these moving pictures that
&gt; claim to be representative of the second most-purchased book of all
&gt; time (in English), after the Bible?

I'd be interested in the evidence someone has (presumably) used to back
up that assertion.

&gt; Isn't that evidence that the film
&gt; actually lacks the things that link the book to our consciousness (how
&gt; many people re-read the book(s)?

Lots.

&gt; How many have sought out the films
&gt; again...?)

Some. Not that many, I would guess. I would hazard a guess that the vast
majority of people who had already read and enjoyed the books, watched
the films and most of them went back to re-reading the books and only a
very few kept re-watching the films. This is pure speculation, as most
of these people would be those that don't feel the need to actively
discuss the books, and just enjoy reading them (ie. not reachable by
most surveys of Tolkien fandom). If you limit yourself to those who
babble online about the books and films, then that might be skewed
towards film re-watchers.

I'll definitely watch them again at some point. It's just, as I've said
before, that I don't feel a need to do so. Not enough time has passed.
In contrast, I read a chapter of 'The Silmarillion' on a train journey
today, and enjoyed the chapter immensely (it was 'Of the Coming of Men
into the West').

&gt; and instead offered us the special effects de jour, along
&gt; with Viggo for the ladies and Liv for the guys?

Well, it was always going to do that. The writing was on the wall from
the very beginning.

&gt; Subways with &quot;FRODO LIVES&quot; traveling the rails in NYC after ROTK was
&gt; published...today...what? Maybe this is the role films play today; to
&gt; simply pass through, like a cinematic lactose intolerance.

'Frodo Lives' goes back a long way, doesn't it? Just a modern
advertising technique using an old trope.

&gt; Maybe I'm just missing it. Maybe there are cultural outposts awash
&gt; with appreciation for Orlando Bloom's dialogue (btw, can you offer
&gt; from memory any memorable dialogue

&quot;It's Sharpe&quot;
&quot;I've broken my carrot&quot;
&quot;Would you like a box&quot;
&quot;Don't tell the elf&quot;
&quot;That counts as one!&quot;

&lt;snip&gt;

&gt; With nothing like the impact of the book, which, conversely, becomes
&gt; more revered in an ever-increasing fantasy and sci-fi market, not more
&gt; typical and common.

Good point. Though in general, you wouldn't expect literary gems like
LotR to emerge more than a few times in a century. It takes a rare
genius.

Christopher

--
---
Reply clue: Saruman welcomes you to Spamgard

&quot;He is not half through yet, and to what he will come in the end not
even Elrond can foretell. Not to evil, I think. He may become like a
glass filled with a clear light for eyes to see that can.&quot; - Gandalf on
Frodo's fate (Many Meetings, FotR)

Report this message