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#1: New Bioweapon Sensor Resembles Tricorder

Posted on 2006-07-11 21:00:51 by sdlitvin

Bioweapon Sensor Mirrors "Star Trek" Tricorder
Richard A. Lovett
for National Geographic News
July 11, 2006

A new sensor being developed can detect bioweapons in sealed packages
from a short distance away—calling to mind Star Trek's handheld scanning
devices known as tricorders.

The bioweapon sensor was co-developed by physicist John Miller, Jr. at
the University of Houston, Texas.

The futuristic device, conceived after the September 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks, is meant to detect life signs in a sealed container without the
risk of opening the suspect package.

It can detect such signals from a sort [sic] distance—about two-fifths
of an inch (a centimeter) away.

The sensor leverages the fact that biochemical reactions in cells emit
electrical signals. These can be detected by scanning cells with
oscillating, low-voltage electrical fields.

Miller notes, for example, that cells from green plants produce a
distinctive signal when exposed to light.

"We see a response when the light is on, but not when the light is off,"
Miller said at a meeting last month of the American Geophysical Union in
Baltimore, Maryland.

Specifically, Miller is detecting photosynthesis in action.

The device is only one example of promising technology being developed
in the growing field of biogeophysics.

The science applies remote-sensing techniques—normally used for studying
rocks, planetary atmospheres, or buried archaeological sites—to living
organisms.

<a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/07/060711-biosensor.html" target="_blank"> http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/07/060711-biose nsor.html</a>


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#2: Re: New Bioweapon Sensor Resembles Tricorder

Posted on 2006-07-12 05:12:48 by JeffDeWitt

Anybody actually read this? The guy hasn't just invented a bioweapon
sensor, it IS a life signs sensor, detecting the electrical signal from
plants using photosynthesis.

This is VERY cool.

&quot;Captain, sensors indicate life signs&quot;!

I LOVE it!

Jeff DeWitt

Steven L. wrote:
&gt; Bioweapon Sensor Mirrors &quot;Star Trek&quot; Tricorder
&gt; Richard A. Lovett
&gt; for National Geographic News
&gt; July 11, 2006
&gt;
&gt; A new sensor being developed can detect bioweapons in sealed packages
&gt; from a short distance away—calling to mind Star Trek's handheld scanning
&gt; devices known as tricorders.
&gt;
&gt; The bioweapon sensor was co-developed by physicist John Miller, Jr. at
&gt; the University of Houston, Texas.
&gt;
&gt; The futuristic device, conceived after the September 11, 2001, terrorist
&gt; attacks, is meant to detect life signs in a sealed container without the
&gt; risk of opening the suspect package.
&gt;
&gt; It can detect such signals from a sort [sic] distance—about two-fifths
&gt; of an inch (a centimeter) away.
&gt;
&gt; The sensor leverages the fact that biochemical reactions in cells emit
&gt; electrical signals. These can be detected by scanning cells with
&gt; oscillating, low-voltage electrical fields.
&gt;
&gt; Miller notes, for example, that cells from green plants produce a
&gt; distinctive signal when exposed to light.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;We see a response when the light is on, but not when the light is off,&quot;
&gt; Miller said at a meeting last month of the American Geophysical Union in
&gt; Baltimore, Maryland.
&gt;
&gt; Specifically, Miller is detecting photosynthesis in action.
&gt;
&gt; The device is only one example of promising technology being developed
&gt; in the growing field of biogeophysics.
&gt;
&gt; The science applies remote-sensing techniques—normally used for studying
&gt; rocks, planetary atmospheres, or buried archaeological sites—to living
&gt; organisms.
&gt;
&gt; <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/07/060711-biosensor.html" target="_blank"> http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/07/060711-biose nsor.html</a>
&gt;
&gt;

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